Next step taken in dog fence rebuild

REBUILD: Member for Flinders Peter Treloar, local Dog Fence board chairperson Craig Trowbridge, new South Australian Dog Fence board chairperson Geoff Power and Minister Tim Whetstone at a section of the fence last year.

REBUILD: Member for Flinders Peter Treloar, local Dog Fence board chairperson Craig Trowbridge, new South Australian Dog Fence board chairperson Geoff Power and Minister Tim Whetstone at a section of the fence last year.

The state government has declared the next major milestone in the rebuild of the South Australian Dog Fence has been reached with the announcement of successful suppliers.

The rebuild of 1600-kilometres of 100-year-old sections of the fence to protect pastoralists from the impact of wild dogs was announced by the state government last year.

Minister for Primary Industries and Regional Development Tim Whetstone said the companies to be involved with the $25-million rebuild had been appointed to panels and would be able to bid for projects in the next round of works.

"There were many local suppliers who put their hands up to be involved in the rebuild, and it's great to see more than half of the successful applicants are based in South Australia," he said.

"Their knowledge and expertise of the South Australian country landscape combined with successful national suppliers will be invaluable to the rebuilding of the dog fence.

"Construction of the dog fence will happen in stages with the successful businesses on the list being able to submit tenders to supply services for each section."

Mr Whetstone said the rebuild was a "once-in-a-generation project" that would provide extra employment opportunities while limiting the impact of wild dogs.

He said it was expected there would be up to 63 full-time jobs created by the third year of the rebuild.

The tender process sought applications from suppliers and contractors for supply of materials needed for the rebuild - including delivery to depots - and fencing contractors.

As well as the successful tender announcement, the state government has also unveiled its 'Virtual Dog Fence' which is an online portal that allows users to view and appreciate the size of the fence.

The new online tool highlights the importance of the dog fence rebuild and allows people to view thousands of kilometres of the barrier.

To create the virtual fence, a photo was taken every two minutes along almost all of the 2150km South Australian structure.

Mr Whetstone said the tool was also a way for people to see the sheer size of the project and to experience the drought conditions much of the region is enduring first-hand.

"It shows just how harsh our landscape is right now for our pastoral communities and it's vital we support them by getting the rebuild underway to safeguard our livestock industry," he said.