West Coast groups benefit from grants

GRANT: Ngura Yadurirn Children and Family Centre received grant funding from Eyre Peninsula Natural Resources Management for its back to country trips project. Picture: Facebook
GRANT: Ngura Yadurirn Children and Family Centre received grant funding from Eyre Peninsula Natural Resources Management for its back to country trips project. Picture: Facebook

A number of West Coast groups were selected through the most recent round of grant funding from the Eyre Peninsula Natural Resources Management (EPNRM) board.

Projects ranging from new opportunities for supporting First Nations culture on country, community nominated coastal management projects and new native gardens were some of the 32 projects selected across three categories - Aboriginal community, community and local government, and farming systems.

West Coast recipients in the Aboriginal community category were Ceduna Aboriginal Corporation's Indigenous language mapping; Ngura Yadurirn Children and Family Centre with its back to country trips; the Streaky Bay Children's Centre's project of connections with local beaches and Wirangu culture in Streaky Bay; and the Far West Coast Aboriginal Corporation's coastal awareness workshops.

Local recipients under the community and local government category were the Elliston District Council with its Elliston Landscape Volunteers Group; and the Poochera Sports Complex project of saving our backyard using sustainable garden practices.

Ngura Yadurirn received $3000 for the back to country trips, which staff member Vicki Coleman said would take place with both the 'Aboriginal yarn time' and 'Minya bubs' groups.

She said they planned on visiting Koonibba and surrounding areas.

"We were pretty rapt to get the funding and the women and keen to go out on trips to country," she said.

"It will give us a chance to be ground and get back out to country, and we'll have some Elders come with us to provide cultural advice."

She said the trips would happen within the next few months.

EPNRM board presiding member Mark Whitfield said it turned out to be a highly competitive grants round, with the most applications to date received.

He said the funding pool was $145,000.

"This year the community has submitted a record number of solution-based applications and I thank everyone who applied," he said.

"On assessing the applications, we approved 32 grants to those applicants who best demonstrated a contribution to achieving targets within the Eyre Peninsula Regional NRM Plan."

EPNRM planning and engagement manager Susan Stovell said it was encouraging to see so many community groups having a proactive role in protecting the region's natural resources, with applications up 40 per cent on previous years.

"It's encouraging to see the depth of applications this year, particularly from our agriculture sector, which is looking at how to apply and share regenerative agriculture learnings, and also our local teachers and educators, who are building awareness of culture and the importance of natural resources in the landscape with children across the region."

To find out about similar grant opportunities in future visit www.environment.sa.gov.au/get-involved/grants-and-funding.