Concern over Ceduna intersection

CONCERN: Julie Cox, Ruby Saunders, Harry Peel, Sonya Halls and Colleen Nicholls are hoping the 'give way' sign will be changed to a 'stop' sign. Picture: Luca Cetta
CONCERN: Julie Cox, Ruby Saunders, Harry Peel, Sonya Halls and Colleen Nicholls are hoping the 'give way' sign will be changed to a 'stop' sign. Picture: Luca Cetta

A Ceduna community member is hoping that after a near-collision the Department of Planning, Transport and Infrastructure (DPTI) can change a 'give way' sign at the Poynton Street and Railway Terrace/Thevenard Road intersection to a 'stop' sign.

Colleen Nicholls has contacted DPTI about the dangers of the intersection after an incident last month which could have ended much worse than it did.

Her daughter Rhianna Nicholls was driving along Railway Terrace heading to Thevenard when a vehicle turning right from Poynton Street failed to adequately give way and came "within millimetres" of the car.

Ms Nicholls said that incident was the "final nail in the coffin".

"The woman slowed down just enough to go through the intersection and missed t-boning my daughter by millimetres," she said.

"My daughter had to stop at the side of the road for 15 minutes after she lost feeling in her legs from shock."

Ms Nicholls said the intersection, with its bend on Railway Terrace obstructing a clear view of traffic for those waiting to turn right from Poynton Street, was an accident waiting to happen.

Her aim is to have the 'give way' sign changed to a 'stop' sign.

"When the intersection was first built there were multiple accidents, and the main reason it has slowed down is most locals know it is a bad corner and stop anyway," she said.

"It is a blind corner, and the fact that you have Kalari running triple road trains through there and at harvest time you have trucks flying there, one day someone will get killed.

"This lady didn't stop enough even though it was a 'give way', but if it was a 'stop' sign she would have to completely stop."

Ms Nicholls took her concerns to Facebook where she ran a poll on the Ceduna Soapbox page asking what, if anything, should be done about the intersection. The overwhelming majority of responses, and comments, were that the intersection needed a 'stop' sign.

"So many have said they avoid the intersection or have had near misses themselves and it is a community concern," she said.

Ms Nicholls contacted DPTI as the road is classed as a government road, and was told they would come to Ceduna to assess the intersection.

In a statement, a DPTI spokesperson said the site inspection would occur within the next month.

"The department is investigating these concerns and will contact Ms Nicholls once the on-site investigation is completed, which, due to the regional location, is expected to occur in three-four weeks," the spokesperson said.

"The analysis the department has undertaken has shown that the intersection has no crash records during the last 10 years.

"The department believes the intersection has sufficient site distance requirements and the junction does not warrant a stop sign. However, this will be confirmed during a site visit."