Letters to the editor

LETTERS: Send letters to the editor to luca.cetta@fairfaxmedia.com.au.
LETTERS: Send letters to the editor to luca.cetta@fairfaxmedia.com.au.

‘Too old’ is up to you

Who decides when you are too old? A calendar, the government, a youngster, an employer – NO – it is each of you who has the greatest influence on how you feel and what you can do and achieve. It is not someone else who determines that your use by date is near.

No-one has a choice about what age you will get to but you are solely responsible for how and what you achieve during the time you are amongst us.

Today, some believe it is their entitlement to determine when someone is too old and it is their indisputable right to make decisions about their future without considering their feelings or wishes.

Lemmy Kilmister, leader of the Rock Band Motorhead, once said: “I don't see why there should be a point where someone else decides when you're too old. I'm not too old and until I decide I'm too old,  I'll never be too @#*! old.” 

Life is ever changing. Time passes quickly, so you shouldn't dwell for too long on mistakes made. When you make a mistake, as most of us will eventually, you shouldn't look back at it for too long.

All of us need to take the reason for the error in our mind and then look forward. Mistakes are lessons of wisdom.

The past cannot be changed, and nor should it be, but the future is in our power and control.

References to ‘back in the day’ quite often annoy the younger generation and the politically correct, who wish to enforce their sanitised view of society on us.

Our future is determined by our past and lessons learnt should not be ignored or deleted to appease those with differing views and standards, who wish to obliterate memories of past events and happenings.

Each generation can learn from one another as society continues to evolve and move forward. No generation can progress in isolation and totally disregard those with valuable experience and deep understanding. Always remember that "to be old and wise, you must first have been young and stupid".

It is up to each of us to embrace new ways and methods which we are faced with. Each of us need to make sure that we adapt and use those which are of benefit to us, but respectfully discard those which we have no use or need for.

Resisting change is futile, as it will occur despite your opposition and deprive you of spending valuable time engaging in those many interests and pursuits which you enjoy.

With each passing year you need to continue to contribute and enjoy what you are doing.  You must age gracefully, not stumble, kicking and screaming into old age, trying to defer or avoid it.

Let it happen and take control of where it will take you. 

Don't ever feel guilty about your age or regret  growing older, as it is a privilege denied to many.

IAN MACGOWAN

Ceduna 

To cap or not to cap

To rate cap or not to rate cap that is the question.

Unfortunately councils have a monopoly on their ratepayers. Householders and commercial owners within an area are at the mercy of a council and must pay an annual charge.

Many homeowners are pensioners on set incomes. In the past these people have had little choice but to pay whatever rate their council has imposed.

The governments move to place a cap on rates should be seen as a way to protect the public from extravagances in council expenditures.

A rate cap will ensure that all councils learn to budget within their means and not their schemes.

City managers will undoubtedly bemoan any change that stifles their spending plans.

DENNIS LIGHTFOOT

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