Letters to the editor

Thank you Ceduna for shave support

On behalf of the Leukaemia Foundation, I would like to extend our sincere thanks and gratitude to Ceduna readers for their incredible support of this years’ 20th World’s Greatest Shave.

The extraordinary people who shaved, cut or coloured their hair plus all their generous sponsors have now raised an incredible $838,000 in SA alone.

This will help the Leukaemia Foundation continue to provide its vital services that will make a genuine difference to local families facing blood cancer.

These services include free accommodation, transport, emotional support and disease specific education to Australians and their families as they find their way through some of the darkest days of their lives.

Plus, funds raised also contributes to Australian researchers who are working tirelessly to discover safer and more effective treatments.

Although their critical research is improving survival rates, sadly 35 Australians are diagnosed with a blood cancer every single day.

Approximately 20,000 people have taken part in this year’s milestone campaign and have shaved or cut away an estimated 7000 kilograms of hair, helping to create wigs for cancer patients.

Thanks to our partners at Sustainable Salons Australia, for the first time shorter hair will now also be used to create ‘hair booms’ which will be used to soak up potential oil spills at sea.

Thank you for your support.

We are well on our way to reaching our goal of $842,000.

There is still time for people to sign up or make a donation at www.worldsgreatestshave.com.au.

Thanks to you, the Leukaemia Foundation will be able to help more Australians with leukaemia, lymphoma, myeloma and related blood disorders survive and live a better quality of life.

BILL PETCH

Leukaemia Foundation chief executive officer

Let's paint our silos

To those interested - it would be nice to have our silos painted. 

There are plenty of subjects to choose from, such as fishing, our beautiful oysters, farming, the unique Aboriginal culture, the train loaded with salt, trucks carting mineral sands, ships at the port, and even our beautiful, majestic coastline.

The possibilities are too many to list but Ceduna and its surrounds have so much to offer.

Perhaps we could include our local talented artists in the discussion?

GWEN SMITH

Ceduna

We must learn from history

As we uphold the Anzac Day tradition, we are reminded of the high price the young men and women of our grandparents' generation paid (“their tomorrows for our todays”) to purchase the freedoms we, their grandchildren, take today for granted.

There is one main reason why so many Australian and Allied young men, women and civilians died in World War I and II.

There was an influential pacifist minority in Allied nations supportive of Germany/Japan.

They talked our leaders out of having a strong defensive readiness to respond to the well-publicised military build-up and territorial expansion of Imperial Germany and Hitler's Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan.

Failing to act on the many signs of pending military aggression, our leaders had to sacrifice the lives of far too many untrained young men, opposing well-trained German and Japanese soldiers, to give the Allies a slim chance to defend our nations and families against enemy invasion, capture and conquest.

Before they could be stopped (with eternal thanks to the USA), many freedom-loving countries fell to those two ruthless aggressors, with millions of men, women and children brutally abused and murdered (countries this generation visits as tourists).

Today, we know China and Russia are excessively well armed, far beyond any need for national defence, and aggressively expanding their territory.

The next 'unexpected' war will be beyond our worst fears. 

Like France's president Macron, let us also reintroduce serious military training for all young people.

This would show our determination to defend our homes, families, freedoms, and our nation.

Let us expose and hold accountable those who oppose national military service, who want to repeat those avoidable great losses of young lives.

The next great conflict will be swift and destructive for under-prepared nations like Australia, which dwell quietly without strong walls or defences.

MIKE JOHNS 

(10 years Army Reserve)

Riverwood, NSW

West Coast Sentinel letters to the editor

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