Wirangu stories told

COASTLINE CARERS: People involved in the Chain of Bays project display a copy of Back to Munda. Pictured were Bob Minnican, Archie Saunders, Grant Hobson and Allan Wilson.
COASTLINE CARERS: People involved in the Chain of Bays project display a copy of Back to Munda. Pictured were Bob Minnican, Archie Saunders, Grant Hobson and Allan Wilson.

THE special connection the Wirangu people have with their land has been highlighted in a new documentary, 'Back to Munda'.

Shot between 2011 and 2013, Back to Munda details revegetation work in the Chain of Bays area near Streaky Bay.

It showed young Aboriginal men and elders' work to improve the area through removing boxthorns, distributing native seeds and creating windbreaks.

The documentary also interviews Wirangu elders, who describe the special connection their people have to the land.

Filmmaker Grant Hobson said the 44-minute documentary allowed the public to gain insight in to the Chain of Bays Caring for our Country project.

"The objective was to enable the wider community to appreciate what was happening on the project," he said.

"People can hear the different opinions and views of the young men involved, show the environment and appreciate why we do this work."

The first showing of the documentary was in Ceduna last month and there was also a showing at Streaky Bay.

Mr Hobson said the showings were well received and it was a great opportunity for the public to learn about the Wirangu culture and the West Coast's native wildlife.

"The Wirangu people I've come to know have a wealth of knowledge and historical perspective on the land," he said.

"Working with elders including Allan Wilson and Archie Saunders has been a rewarding experience, to share the view they have has opened a completely new way of viewing the landscape."

The Wirangu elders appreciated having the chance to tell their stories to the public.

Elected representative of the Wirangu people Allan Wilson said it was important to preserve the land as they were a part of it.

"It was great to do the work in such a beautiful place, as well as giving the young men new knowledge and skills," he said.

"For the wider community we can show how we're working together and what the country is like.

"All things tell a story and we are one with the country, we are part of a jigsaw."

With permission from the people involved, Back to Munda will be set up to be viewed online at www.chainofbays.com.au