Farmers can defend canola

CANOLA: Researcher Dr Angela Van de Wouw in a canola paddock. Picture: Supplied

CANOLA: Researcher Dr Angela Van de Wouw in a canola paddock. Picture: Supplied

Canola growers in the southern cropping region still have blackleg control options, despite reduced efficacy to the fluquinconazole seed treatment observed.

Marcroft Grains Pathology and the University of Melbourne undertook a Grains Research and Development Corporation investment and saw while fluqionconazole seed treatment was not 100 per cent effective in about one in seven paddocks, other fungicides from the same mode were unaffected.

In 2015, 200 Australian paddocks were surveyed which found 15 per cent of tested stubble contained fungal isolates with tolerance to fluquinconazole.

Researcher Dr Angela Van de Wouw said tolerance meant a reduced efficacy against blackleg, which created concern about effectiveness of other ingredients.

“Put simply, proothioconazole plus tebuconazole and flutriafol still remain effective against blackleg in situations where fluquinconazole has shown reduced efficacy,” she said.

This comes as good news with an expected 30 per cent increase in canola plantings this year.

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