Ceduna family grateful for support of youth cancer charity CanTeen

SUPPORT: Tara Rogers is grateful for the help of CanTeen following her mother Amanda Rogers' breast cancer diagnosis in 2013. Picture: Luca Cetta

SUPPORT: Tara Rogers is grateful for the help of CanTeen following her mother Amanda Rogers' breast cancer diagnosis in 2013. Picture: Luca Cetta

DAILY life for the Rogers family is anything but normal.

Amanda Rogers, 41, was diagnosed with invasive breast cancer in February 2013.

Currently in remission, the Ceduna resident continues to undergo surgery, most recently six weeks ago.

Daughter Tara goes to boarding school in Port Lincoln.

Miss Rogers is one of about 1800 children aged between 12 and 25 in South Australia who each year will receive the devastating notice a parent has been diagnosed with cancer.

The news of Mrs Rogers' cancer diagnosis came just one week after the death of her father Colin from gastric cancer.

Miss Rogers, 17, is only able to see her parents during school holidays and some weekends, but with support from youth cancer charity CanTeen has found a network to help deal with the situation.

"I was really close with my grandfather and then this happened and I didn't cope well," she said.

"I found others my age not understanding, so CanTeen has been a massive help."

Mrs Rogers appreciates the support her daughter receives, which she thinks makes a big difference.

"It can be hard to find support, but CanTeen makes it easier,” she said.

“It is designed for the kids and Tara has enjoyed having that support.

"It's not always about the person with cancer, but also those that are close are affected too."

CanTeen offers a raft of support services which Tara has found helpful at this difficult time.

"There are camps, activities and all day online support,” she said.

"I often have phone calls and have spoken to people online a few times.

"It's very comforting and has helped me understand the difference between the cancer my grandfather and mother have suffered."

CanTeen will celebrate National Bandanna Day on Friday 28 October, its major annual fundraiser.

“Young people affected by cancer often feel incredibly isolated, which is why the friendships and support offered by CanTeen are so important,” CanTeen SA/NT division manager Brad Manuel said.

“The CanTeen bandanna has become a powerful symbol of hope, connection and resilience for the young people we work with and a show of solidarity from the whole community.”

Mrs Rogers agreed National Bandanna Day played an important role.

“Without that support the structure wouldn’t be there and it would take away options,” she said.

“People supporting it is a big deal because young people don’t realise the help is there for them.”

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