Wudinna celebrates with centenary

IT was a big weekend for Wudinna as the community celebrated 100 years.

CENTENARY: Heather Petty, Sue Dubois, Wudinna mayor Eleanor Scholz and Gabby Waters at the Winds of Change art exhibition which opened the Wudinna Centenary weekend.

CENTENARY: Heather Petty, Sue Dubois, Wudinna mayor Eleanor Scholz and Gabby Waters at the Winds of Change art exhibition which opened the Wudinna Centenary weekend.

The weekend began with an art exhibition on Friday night where more than 200 people attended to hear the winners announced.

The hall was open all weekend and will be open until the end of September from 10am to 4pm.

Credit must go to all the organisers and volunteers but also to Janet and Kim Foster for all the hours and time they spent preparing.

In spite of the rainy weather, the Wudinna and Le Hunte Show was a great success with double the usual crowd.

It seemed everyone living in Wudinna was doing their bit to make the weekend a success.

The registration desk was a great contributor where people were issued with name tags, including maiden names and locations, making it much easier to recognise old friends.

The fashion parade through the ages went ahead in stages because of the rain as girls modelled dresses owned by people in the past.

The rain affected some of the outside events but no one really seemed to mind.

A mammoth effort by various groups ensured food was available all day Saturday, then in the evening various groups entertained as young people danced to the music.

Sunday started fine and seating was arranged at the Apex Park for an Ecumenical Service with Pastor Peter Traeger taking the service and Tim Scholz playing the electric organ.

The morning offered opportunities for people to chat and share past memories.

Maurie Bartley, who turned 100 last May, attended and was applauded.

Each of the districts – Koongwa, Kyancutta, Pygery, Yaninee and Minnipa – had someone tell the story of their district.

The communities were very involved and stories included one about the Kyancutta Hall being called an institute to allow it to stay open all hours compared with the other halls, which were declared “Public” and had to close earlier.

The Ecumenical Council provided food for a barbecue lunch and a young group performed dance and music finished off the entertainment.

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